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Documentaries: Hubris: Selling the Iraq War
How the Bush administration sold the Iraq war
THE WAR DID NOT HAVE TO HAPPEN
Hubris: The Selling of the Iraq War, a documentary special hosted by Rachel Maddow will re-air Friday, March 22 at 9 p.m. ET on MSNBC.
Hubris: Selling the Iraq War, which chronicles how the Bush administration marketed the 2003 Iraq war to the American people. The documentary, which includes interviews with insiders such as President Bush’s Undersecretary for Defense Douglas Feith, Gen. Anthony Zinni, the former commander in chief of U.S. Central Command, and many others, takes viewers through the key decisions that put American troops in harm’s way.
The reporting raises tough questions about the administration’s decisions, actions–and motives. It also, at a time when the movie Zero Dark Thirty has drawn attention to the issue, shows viewers the role that torture played in intelligence-gathering after 9/11. The real-life role of torture in pre-Iraq war intelligence, which is reported in Hubris, has far scarier implications than the Hollywood version.

The documentary is hosted by Rachel Maddow. It will re-air Friday, March 22, at 9 p.m. The documentary premiered earlier this month on MSNBC. We spoke with Isikoff about the impact of this story as the ten-year anniversary of the invasion of Iraq approaches.
Iraq War killed 190,000 people, 70 percent civilians and 4,488 U.S. service members and will cost the U.S. taxpayer $2.2 trillion, U.S. researchers say.

Catherine Lutz, a professor at Brown University, and Neta C. Crawford, a professor of Boston University, co-directors of the Watson Institute for International Studies, said the Costs of War project involved 30 economists, anthropologists, lawyers, humanitarian personnel, political scientists from 15 universities, U.N. staff and members of other organizations.

The report found 134,000 civilians died of direct war violence in Iraq. This number does not account for indirect deaths due to increased vulnerability to disease or injury as a result of war-degraded conditions. That number is estimated to be several times higher, the researchers said. At least 3,400 U.S. contractors died in Iraq as well, the report said.

Iraq's healthcare infrastructure was devastated from sanctions before and during the war. More than half of Iraq's doctors left the country during the 2000s, and tens of thousands of Iraqi patients are forced to seek healthcare outside the country, the report said.

The $60 billion spent on reconstruction in Iraq went for military and police -- not infrastructure such as roads, healthcare and water treatment systems. The Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction found massive fraud, waste and abuse of reconstruction funds, the report said.

Because the Iraq War appropriations were funded not by cutting U.S. expenses but from borrowing, the cumulative interest through 2053 could amount to more than $3.9 trillion,